Blogging

Blogging: Comment Baiting

Comment Baiting

There are many ways that you can encourage your readers to comment. The way you structure your posts can have the effect of drawing out comments. This can be achieved by using a question in the title and/or question(s) at the end of the posts as well. You can also make reference to being interested in hearing reader feedback in the body of the post.

Comment baiting example

Title: Is _________ a helpful blogging tool?
I have been using a ___________ for several months now and find it to be quite helpful with my blogging. I have only noticed two small things I’m not keen about and I will be discussing these in my review below. I’m really interested to hear what you readers have to say about your experience with ________.

    [body of post goes in here]

At the end of your post ask Discussion questions:

  • Have you used _____?
  • Did you have any problems with it?
  • Is there anything else you would like to share about ___?

The Do’s of Comment Baiting

  1. Do your titles and subtitles encourage comments?
  2. Does the text in your posts encourage comments by stating you are looking for reader feedback?
  3. Do you blog on controversial subjects? Controversy sparks discussion too but if you go this direction then:
    (a)  Be well informed about your subject and conversant with all points of view on your subject;
    (b)  Be honest and do not give into the temptation to distort truth for your own purposes. Do not falsify facts, do not present a few facts as the whole story, do not present tentative findings as firm conclusions.
    (c) Use sound evidence to explain and support your ideas. When using evidence, be sure not to take quotations out of context, not to juggle numbers or statistics, and not to present unusual cases as representative examples. Use sources of information that are objective and qualified and link to them appropriately.
    (d) Employ valid reasoning and avoid such fallacies as making hasty generalizations, asserting causal connections where none exist, using invalid analogies, and pandering to passion or prejudice.
  4. Do you conclude your posts with a question for reader discussion?
  5. Do you answer comments you receive promptly and individually?
  6. Do you comment on the posts of bloggers who have commented on your posts?
  7. Do you backlink to your readers’ posts in your own posts?
  8. Do you use a Recent Visitors widget and/or a Top Commenters widget?
  9. Do you promote your posts throughout social networks to keep your readers aware of when you publish new posts?
  10. Do you provide RSS and/or atom feeds and encourage subscriptions?
  11. Do you provide  readers offer updates by email and encourage subscriptions?
  12. Do you offer newsletters and encourage subscriptions?
  13. Do you have a forum?
  14. Do you conduct reader polls and surveys?
  15. Do you encourage your readers to become guest authors on your blog?

The Dont’s of Comment Baiting

Activities to avoid as they can be perceived as being “spammy” are:

  • begging for comments and/or followers on forums;
  • posting into forum threads or leaving comments on blog posts revealing you had nothing meaningful to add to the discussion, which in return reveals you are an attention seeker who is inclined to being “sneaky”;
  • and/or flooding shoutboxes and message boxes in social networks with invitations to visit your blog.

Extraordinary comment baiting -> Dont’ ever try this unless you can handle it as well as raincastoer does. If you click this mummified fairy remains link there are over 2,000 comments so it will take awhile to load.