Blogging

Writing a Strong Introduction

Don’t agonize over writing a strong introduction. Begin by writing your conclusion first. If you are clear where you want readers to end up then charting the course to get them there becomes easier.

 

You can use “strategic listening” via online tools to listen what’s being said about any topic before you write about it and publish, but how you say what you have to say makes a big difference when it comes to getting your posts read.

Powerful writing is readable, focused, concrete and well-suited for its audience. Powerful writing is compelling and passionate. Powerful writing develops gracefully. Powerful writing flows.– 8 Qualities of Powerful Writing

The more you write, the more powerful and persuasive your writing will become and the larger your audience will grow.

Once your targeted post title has piqued reader interest, your first sentence must be a strong one that “hooks” readers into reading on. So sitting down to write by creating a strong introduction right off the top can be intimidating. I prefer to create an outline and use it as a map but the parts I complete aren’t always done 1-2-3 order. When I bog down I refresh my intention and remind myself of my target audience, what I have to say and my desired outcome.

If you have been bogged down trying to create a strong introduction then try focusing on drafting a conclusion that sums up what you want to communicate and what you expect from your readers in response. It works for me and for others too because conclusions often mirror introductory paragraphs.

Once you have a draft conclusion (first drafts are inevitably awful), edit it and in doing so you may find you have more than enough of what it takes to create a winsome introductory paragraph too.

Here is some advice about creating a strong introduction.

  1. Readers skim read so use targeted keywords and keep your introduction simple and use as few words as
  2. possible.
  3. Lead with a compelling opening statement, an interesting quotation or a provocative question.
  4. Provide enough background to set the stage for the featured content.
  5. Craft your penultimate sentence to create a smooth transition between your lead and content.
  6. Make your thesis statement or take your stand on your topic in the final sentence of your introduction.